All posts filed under: Photography

Santorini

I know what image pops into your head when I say Santorini; it’s these views. Santorini really is exactly as you imagine it. Sparkling blue water, pastel coloured buildings perched one on top of another, steep cliffs with donkeys walking up their winding staircases and domed churches contrasted against the bright sky. As one of the most popular Greek islands though, expect high prices during the peak season and bustling groups of tourists crowding the small roads and walkways. We kept up our tradition alive and hired a quad bike to make our own way around the island, first riding from Fira where we were staying to the small town of Oia. Home to those blue domed churches and beautiful sunset views, Oia is one of the most popular places to visit in Santorini. As we wandered around we saw multiple brides being photographed for a bridal shoot and tourists hustling to get the pictures of that iconic view. There is also a coastal path you can walk from Fira to Oia, which we did half …

To the islands. First, Mykonos!

Blue and White. There’s a reason these are the colours of the Greek flag, because Greece is blue and white. Particularly the Cyclades, and most certainly Mykonos. Crystal clear water, white houses with blue shutters and window boxes spilling with blooms, white crazy-patterned pavements, and picturesque churches around every bend. If you’re going to make the trip, head there in the shoulder season months of April, May, September and October. It’s warm but not stifling hot, prices are cheaper, and it’s not as busy but everything is still open after shutting down over the winter. It’s also a more relaxed, local atmosphere as opposed to the high-rolling glitterati that descend during high season. We spent one day strolling through Mykonos town exploring Little Venice and the shops that spill onto the lanes. We wandered along the beach, ate gelati, ate gyros, and then wandered around some more. It was a hard day, very strenuous.     On our second day we hired a quad-bike, which started some kind of tradition as we did it on each of …

The ancient city of Athens

The Acropolis stands over the city of Athens as a lasting symbol of its past. Because everything about Athens is its history. The birthplace of democracy, Aristotle, Plato, and civilisation as we know it is because of Ancient Greece and its capital Athens. I’m not lying when I say that I left Athens after barely two days feeling smarter, and more appreciative and understanding of history. Some fun facts: A misconception that I was guilty of thinking (and let’s not judge if you knew better), but the Acropolis is not the beautiful temple sitting on top of the rock, it is the rock. The word Acropolis means highest, outermost (acro) point of the  city (polis) which is typically chosen as a point of defence. The most commonly photographed temple atop the Acropolis is the Parthenon, which was first built as a temple to the goddess of Athena, the city’s patron. The official distance of a marathon (42.195km) is the distance a soldier had to run to Athens in his full armour to relay the result of …

Istanbul, where East meets West.

A sea of tulips in front on the Blue Mosque in Sultanahmet; markets bustling with bodies as the aromas of spices fill the air; smiling faces standing outside restaurants ushering you in to sample their meals; stray cats and dogs milling on the streets in search of the scraps given by kind locals; cobblestone pathways winding through the streets that are lined with cramped buildings. These are the images that come to mind when I recall my time spent in Istanbul, the city where the East and West meet. Filled with culture, history, religion, and delicious food, my time in Istanbul was fleeting. Four days felt like a long time to spend there, but when I think of the sheer expanse of this city compared with what we saw, we only scratched the surface. The Blue Mosque, Hagia Sofia, the Grand Bazaar and the Topkapi Palace Gardens were all on the to-do list. The mosques were stunning with their intricate mosaic walls and ceilings, and the gardens surrounding them flooded with tulips in full bloom. …

Don’t just go to Queenstown when you go to Queenstown

Yes, my trip was a few months ago…yes, I’m finally getting around to posting…no, the mountains probably don’t have snow on them anymore…sorry. If you have the time and the means, the surrounding areas and towns around Queenstown are worth a visit, if not just for the views. I know, I know, all I have gone on about in these Queenstown posts is the scenery…but I tell you, it’s just so beautiful. Who doesn’t love a bit of pretty nature hey? We hired a car and made our way to our first stop of Arrowtown, a charming old miner’s town only 20 minutes out of Queenstown. It still has a street of miner’s cottages and old store fronts, and provides the perfect place for a stroll, some coffee and morning tea, and maybe even a wander through the museum. We then wound our way up Crown Range Road over and through the mountains to the lakeside town of Wanaka. Sitting on the edge of Lake Wanaka, the town is a popular resort town for the nearby ski fields. …

The breathtaking beauty of Milford Sound

Yes, my trip was a few months ago…yes, I’m finally getting around to posting…no, the mountains probably don’t have snow on them anymore…sorry. I think the only phrase I could use to describe Milford Sound is ‘stunning natural beauty’.  It’s a place that rains two out every three days, is surrounded by cliffs, mountains and rainforests, and is one of the most popular places to visit in New Zealand. If you like waterfalls, mountains, trees, penguins, seals and just all round spectacular landscapes, then I would suggest the day trip to Milford from Queenstown is a must do. It’s not an easily accessible place unless you have some major coin to spring for a plane or helicopter ride, but tour companies offering day bus trips are bountiful. The tour will include your bus trip to and from Queenstown to Milford Sound as well as a cruise (some might even throw in lunch), but be prepared to be up at the crack of dawn and spend most of your day on the bus. We were lucky …